Jail Tales: Female Trouble

Jail Tales: Female Trouble

Given that much of the subject matter on our tours involves lawbreaking folks, we have always been particularly interested in the jail, and in particular the experiences of women in the legal system. On our Downtown Sin and Gin Tours, we discuss the creation of the women’s ward in the jail, and the hiring of female wardens. In case you can’t get enough jail fun facts, here’s a sampler of some jail history from our notes.

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes

We've been honored to be your punk rock historians for these seven years, but the time has come for us to step aside and allow this wacky business to grow and change under new leadership. We are delighted to share that Good Time Girls is now officially in the hands of longtime guides, Kolby LaBree and Wren Urbigkit. We can't wait to go on their tours with all of you! 

What We Don't Know: Self-Discovery Through Art

What We Don't Know: Self-Discovery Through Art

"There is a trusting I’ve found that fuels my confidence as an artist.  When I look at a piece that I have just completed, particularly in my collage work, there is a wise reveal.  An inside look; a gift of shape, line and color that speaks to a moment of truth.  Often my work will share with me something I didn’t know."

Victorian bicycles and corsets: Two Village Books events co-sponsored by The Bureau!

Victorian bicycles and corsets: Two Village Books events co-sponsored by The Bureau!

When and why were roads first paved on a major scale?  What's the difference between an Ordinary and a safety?  What revolutionary change came to cycling in the 1890's, what significance did the bicycle have for women - and why did penny-farthings have such a big front wheel? Learn the answers to these questions, and many more. Join husband and wife Gabriel and Sarah Chrisman as they give a presentation about Victorian bicycles. They will travel to Bellingham from Port Townsend on their historic bikes, Gabriel on his 1887 Singer Challenge bicycle.

A Very Special Collection, or: An Extrovert in an Introvert's World

A Very Special Collection, or: An Extrovert in an Introvert's World

Libraries, archives and other repositories of knowledge aren’t places that were built for people like me. I love learning new stuff and uncovering facts from primary sources, BUT I do not learn well in the traditional model of sit-quietly-and-read. I exclaimed in class a lot as a kid… and as an adult. I LOVED group projects, group discussions, asking questions, presentations, film projects, anything that involved a lot of talking and working with others. I HATED reading text books, writing papers, studying alone... Being alone. I felt sure that this was a defect. I tried very hard to do the things I hated, thinking I was doing learning wrong.

A place to call our own.

A place to call our own.

Our business anniversary is just around the corner. It's hard to believe that Marissa and I started this little operation this time nearly three years ago. We began with the idea that we'd share some stories about local history while dressed in costume. We worried that no one would show up, but we knew that at the very least we'd have fun.

Fast forward through three tour seasons, countless special events, and the filming of a documentary series, and you'll end up smack dab in the heart of downtown Bellingham, 217 West Holly Street: The new home for our business, The Bureau of Historical Investigation.

This is Frederick Dames.

This is Frederick Dames.

I discovered Herr Dames by complete accident in April of 2011 while researching the microfilmed archives of the old Bellingham Herald. What had started out as a quest to develop a walking tour about the turn of the century red light district that had operated legally in my weird little northwest town, evolved into a general fascination with all minutiae of odd and obscure figures and facts about the place I had come to call home.

Message In A Bottle

Message In A Bottle

A message in a bottle was found on a beach in B.C., originally dropped in the ocean by a guy named Earl Willard en route from “Frisco” to Bellingham in 1906. The find made news partly because it may be the oldest surviving message in a bottle to date.  We also found it exciting that the message inside listed a visible Bellingham address! 

 

Mary Pickford and the Changing Role of the Actress in America

Mary Pickford and the Changing Role of the Actress in America

Pickford's stage debut coincides with a cultural shift in post-Victorian America. The idea of female purity in the Victorian Era (1830s-1900s) was inextricably connected with domesticity and the home; women who lived a public or nomadic life were by their very nature suspect. But after Queen Victoria's death in 1901 a gradual relaxation of rules about where women should be seen and heard took place.